Evolution of the Wand: Lesson 2

November 05, 2019

Evolution of the Wand: Lesson 2

(Professor Nikos enters his empty classroom. Following him are two levitating boxes that are annoyingly nudging each other.)

“Excuse me?!?! I hope you two do not behave like this during class.”

(The two wooden boxes perch on opposite corners of the front counter with subtle grunting.)

“Times like these I feel more like a parent than a Professor.”

(Slebo leans back against the counter with both boxes on opposite sides him.His hands clinch the wooden edge of the table.)

“I’m warning you two now, this is a big day for the three of us. No sass, no back talk, no bickering. I need you to Inspire these students..........or its back into the attic.”

(The class begins to trickle in and take their seats. The boxes rest silent. The Professor waves his wand over the chalkboard and the chalk begins scrawling.)

“Good morning Class.”

(He leans against the counter with arms crossed.)

“Today we will discuss...”

(Points to the chalkboard)

“The Evolution of the Wand.”

(Professor Nikos begins to pace.)

“As I mentioned in our introduction, Wands have been used in magic for thousands of years. From Ancient Persians to the Native Americans. The oldest wand was found was in 1823 inside a 33,000 year old tomb.”

(The box to the right begins to shake with muffled yelling. The Class jolts in shock.)

“Ahem!!” (Slebo yells sternly and the mystery object stops.)

“In Celtic, Anglo, Saxon, and Norse mythology there are recordings of sacred sticks for magical use. The grimoire titled ‘The Key of Solomon’ contained instructions on how to make a wand: Was to be made of hazel or cane, a cubit long, and it’s bark stripped of it.”

(The box on the left begins chuckling.)

“Oh fine!!!”

(The class begins to giggle.)

“Who better to speak of the evolution of current wands, anyway?”

(Waves his wand and the tops of the boxes reveal two bronze busts. The Class watches in awe as the two heads move and speak as though they are alive like the living portraits on the walls.)

“Class allow me the honor of introducing Mykew Gregorovich and Garrick Ollivander.”

(The two busts bow their heads)

Ollivander says, “Thank you, Professor.”

Gregorovich says, “Many Thanks, Professor.”

“Mr. Gregorovich. You won the coin toss, please. Please start us off.”

(The bronze living likeness of the Russian Wandmaker clears his throat and speaks to the class in his low, thick accent. He bows his head.)

“Your Professor speaks true. Over time, other materials vere experimented in vondmaking. Metals, crystals, and magical creature substances, vich we know now as cores. Vot vos unexpected vos how the core gave the vond it’s temperament, a mind of it’s own, you vould say. Which means the vond chooses the Vizard that it closely identifies vith .”

(Mr. Ollivander chimes in with his raspy British voice.)

“Back in my Father’s time of running the family wandmaking business, Witches and Wizards would bring to him their own cores with which they had some personal connection. Gervase, my Father, would install the core into a wand. This method of wandmaking, as you Americans say...”

(Ollivander smirks as he looks over to Slebo.)

“Was hit or miss. If the core was not paired with the correct wood or had not chosen the correct wizard, the wand would never reach its full potential nor would the Wizard. It was I who had discovered the three supreme cores: Unicorn tail hair, Dragon heartstring, and Phoenix feather. These cores are the best in the business.”

(Slebo smirks behind Garrick and begins his portion of the lesson.)

“This is where Mr. Ollivander and I have reached an empass.”

(Mykew adds.)

“And I. Simply because you don’t understand the core does not give the right to dismiss it.”

(Professor Nikos resumes.)

“Thank you, Mr. Gregorovich. Mr. Ollivander’s Supreme Cores are strong yes, because they were drawn from strong creatures. However, the three do not favor a particular field of magic. They are strong but neutral and, much to Mr. Ollivander’s credit, has set the standard for wand strength. That being said, the three of us have debated if a core and wood of similar magical properties were paired, it could exceed the standard in the wand’s respective field.”

(Mr. Gregoravich adds.)

“Mr. Ollivander vas alvays hesitant on using more temperamental cores, like veela hair, for instance. I believe the more free thinking of a vand, the more suited to the vizard and therefore a more powerful tool.”

(Garrick huffs.)

“A wizard having only one wand at it’s peak potential can, in turn, maximize the potential of the wizard. The wand can learn spells with its master and would not be required to carry a plethora of wands for individual tasks.”

(Professor Nikos addresses the class.)

“As you can see we’ve been at this for a while.”

(The class has a laugh as does the two bronze busts.)

(Slebo continues.)

“In conclusion, the evolution of Wandlore has grown in its capability as much as its complexity and with it has grown several philosophies. Where Wandlore goes from here rests on your shoulders, Students. That’ll be all for today, Class. Thank you.”

 

 

~ About The Author ~

The lessons posted are written by David Slebodnik. A humble Wandmaker that resides in Seattle, WA whom has a great deal of love and respect for Wizarding World Community. David believes that wands are as unique and diverse of the people who wield them. David has researched Wandlore for over five years in the Harry Potter series as well as other magical faiths to honor the beliefs of all practitioners and cosplayers alike.

He does have an ample inventory in his shop BibelotsAndBygones on Etsy, but is well known for making custom wands and other magical wares. David’s doors and Instagram are always open to new patrons.




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